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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- mentioned that it has been declared a by california governor jerry brown, who will be visiting jpl later on. i want to start with our panel and introduce them. first we have michael meyer, the lead scientist for the mars exploration program in washington. we have the msl project manager for the jet propulsion laboratory. we have the physical investor of the -- investigator of the chem cam instrument from the los alamos laboratory in new mexico. next is the lead rubber plant at -- leader rover planner at jpl. also the principal investigator from chem cam in new mexico. last, the deputy project scientist at jpl. we will start with a special announcement from michael. >> before i make the announcement, which i think all of you will enjoy, i would like to show you a short video. this video was made on the eve of the arrival at mars -- this was in november of 1971. in the video, you will see a couple of people you might recognize -- bruce murray and carl sagan and ray bradbury. if we can look at that video -- >> i was hoping, during the last few days, as we get closer to mars and the dust cleare
: where was the rover built? >> it was built here at jpl. we had lots of partners all over the world too, where the science missions have been donated by foreign countries. >> bill: did you do -- the launch -- or the landing, was so perfect. did you do any practice runs like -- i'm just curious, like in the desert or anything? >> there has been an extensive testing of everything on here instruments, landing. you name it we have tested it. i don't know if they did a full end-to-end testing. i would have to ask one of the landing engineers. >> bill: but certainly all of the instruments and cameras, was all tested. >> yes, we have continuing to test even today. we're doing extensive testing on the drilling and arm, and we'll continue to test all through the mission. >> bill: let me ask you what have we learned so far? >> we have learned that we have landed in a very exciting place. this mission is not -- unlike anything else we have ever flown. it's very, very complex. it has more instruments more things to do than anything we have put down on the surface of the planet. we
. >> thousands. mission control at jpl, you have probably other people. they built the spacecraft there. everything was assembled there. and now you've got teams of scientists that are running the different instrument packages. so it's big team for a $2.5 billion mission i >> put something in perspective. we'll do a live remote with somebody. they could be in downtown washington. we could talk with them and there will be a significant delay from when i ask the question and you get the answer from the person. you go from place to place, you can't get coverage, you can't hear something would might be three miles away. >> is this a rap session. >> no, no, no, here is my question. how are we able to control this device 352 million miles away. how is it it can send a picture back within moments of landing on mars? >> because it is all set in the computer program. what they did for this was mars odyssey which is a spacecraft that is in orbit was using the radio uplink between the spacecraft which is now the rover and they were sending data back because the thing that is amazing, when she was
for missions to mars is only about one in three. here 59 jpl they've gone 13 for 18. that's a 7: -- .720 batting average in the red planet league. even so this time the nerves are racheted higher along with the stakes. >> facing budget pressure from the white house, nasa has reduced funding for mars missions and pulled out of plans to partner with the european space agency to stage an elaborate series of missions to mars to bring a rock sample back to earth. much to the dismay of the mars science community. jim bell is president of the planetary society and also on the spirit opportunity and curiosity imaging teams. >> it's frustrating to try and understand why the administration or congress would want to stop what so many americans are incredibly proud of and has been so successful. >> one of their big apply loos is democratic congressman adam shift who represents the california district that is home to the jet propulsion lab. >> if we step back from mars now at a time when we are tantalizingly close to finding the building blocks of life on mars, it may be decades before we go back. >>
, there is a bit of a peanut tradition. please explain. >> well, at jpl, you know, with a nearly 50-year record of unbelievable planetary exploration, about 40 years ago the tradition began of opening peanuts when a keen event in planetary exploration began. we passed the peanuts around for good luck right before opportunity landed. and of course some of the pebbles under the rover deck remind us of those peanuts so it's all a good thing. >> and also, mohawk guy. cnn talked to him just yesterday. let's roll the sound. >> the thought that in some way of kids and other people that are motivated to come work here because they see me and they say, that guy can put stuff on mars, maybe i can too, i would like to say it takes all types to make these missions work. >> have you been just overwhelmed by the excitement? and i'm not just talking about his mohawk, but the whole deep space exploration, really just this outpouring in the last couple of days i'm sure globally. what does that mean for you and nasa? >> well, it means so much for all of us, because this is an 11-year journey. the engineers at jp
. john blackstone is at jpl in pasadena, california. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. i think we can safely say this morning that the jet propulsion lab is the happiest place on earth. because the "curiosity" over, the car-sized rover, this is just a model, the real thing is safely on the surface of mars. it's such a complex landing that some observers gave the chances of success at no better than 50/50. nobody had ever done anything like this before. and it was all happening 154 million miles away. >> we're just under six minutes to entry. >> in mission control, the tension was obvious as the spacecraft approached mars to begin what was called seven minutes of terror. but with each successful stage of the entry, confidence grew. >> parachute deploy. [ applause ] >> nothing was certain, however, until "curiosity" was confirmed to have landed safely on martian soil. >> touchdown confirmed we are safe on mars. [ cheering ] >> as the celebration began, mission control seemed to lose control. many involved had been working on this mars rover for a decade. >> lift-off. >>
to be there sunday night at jpl lab, in the control room. >> no way. >> watching the thing. it's really cool, you know whatever the satellite or whatever it is that's taking it up there, near mars and there is a parachute. >> a rocketship. >> okay. the parachute opens and the rover comes down and then there is a crane actually that will lower it and put it right on the surface. >> they are doing this from however far mars is away from here? millions of miles? >> unbelievable. >> will we be able to watch any of that, i wonder. >> we have the olympics. we can at least have this. >> this might be the only thing that could pull me away from the olympics. i might actually watch this. >> they are going to tape delay it if it's on nbc. >> that's true. >> why don't you find out and let us know before the end of the program. i think it's very exciting. again, citizens united. health care here at the top of the hour and jobs in the next hour. but first: >> this is the full"the full court press". >> other headlines making news two major gold medal wins for the u.s. in lonton
to do it at jpl. >> exciting stuff. >> i know you will write about this. >> one last thing, tony. >> tucker says it will clear up this weekend. we can see mars in the western sky. i will have a chart this weekend so people can go out and look and see mars, wave hello at curiosity and check out the meteor shower on saturday night, the per see equaled. >> that's right. >> thanks. good to have you. >> thanks, greg, tony. >>> time is 8:38. monday morning. still ahead, football preseason is underway. we will show you highlights from the hall of fame game. e. i'm drinking dunkin'. i'm drinking dunkin' iced mocha. they make it exactly how i like it. medium, iced, with a turbo shot. french vanilla, hazelnut, caramel -- i love 'em all. they make it perfect every time. america runs on dunkin' coffee. that's mom to you. and you should eat something that's good for you before you go outside. never! come on james. it's a new fiber one chewy bar. chocolatey and delicious. fiber one chewy bar, huh? mmm. refueled space captain james. [ male announcer ] new fiber one chewy bars. great taste kids
laboratory or jpl. you are steely-eyed missile men and you deserve every missed high five of your celebration. i got to say, it was nice to see that nasa saved money by hiring staff from the local best buy. but, folks -- it's a penny pincher, a penny pincher. and, folks, just cry to conceive of what was achieved this morning. we gently landed a one ton, six-wheel suv 154 million miles from earth. i mean, that onstar lady is getting good. we now have two rovers on the surface of mars and three satellites orbiting it. basically if the planets are a tray of donuts, we have now licked mars. it's ours. we already had the moon, we just need venus for the monopoly and we can start building hotels on them. >> welcome back to "morning joe." sam stein and katty kay are still with us, along with john meacham in new york. joining us here in washington, the host of "hardball" chris matthews. and author of "jack kennedy." >> chris, you came on set and said you like what harry reid did. >> how could you like that? >> i liked it because i think obama has needed confederates in the field for most of his life
think it's in the 9s. those engineers at jpl are really good. >> landing on mars has been a tricky thing. 70% of the missions that landed on mars have failed. that's both the u.s. and with russia as well. what are the factors that complicate this? >> the atmosphere of mars is thick enough to heat your spacecraft and melt it on the way in if you don't slow down in the right way. it's thin enough that it's hard to slow down. it's a delicate balance between slowing down fast enough and not slowing down at all. that's what takes this incredibly complicated heat shield parachute rocket sky crane maneuver. >> not to mention, this is something that scientists won't be seeing in real time. there's going to be a delay. why? >> well, it takes 14 minutes at this point for light to get from mars to earth. radio signals too. so this lander will be on the surface of mars in one piece or many for seven minutes before the signal gets back to earth to tell us that it's successful or not. >> we've had missions like this before. what makes this one different in. >> well, this one, it's the size of a smart
the olympics. it sounded like last night at the jpl, at the jet prop pulse lab who are the ones responsible for the mars rover working for nasa. their laboratory in pasadena california. here was the big word. >> wooo! wooo >> they are wound pretty tight. >> they have been working. imagine how many years they have been working on this thing. >> sure, yeah. >> how much money they spent. originally, they put one.$6,000,000,000 toward this project and it ended up costing two and a half billion dollars. >> my tax dollars well spent. >> uh-huh. >> just amazing. what was it? like 14 minutes or so because there wasn't any direct line with earth at the time that it landed. so it took 14 minutes for it to kind of turn the corner and make that what? 154 million miles. so it took that long. there was a period where they thought it was down but they didn't know for like 14 minutes, i guess. they had to wait and wait and wait and wait and then boom. >> that's when that news came. very exciting. >> it's awesome. i love -- i love the space program stuff. >> yeah. >> and the
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)